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Skhilled

2022 Aug 26 19:33:16
LOL
 

Ken

2022 Aug 26 14:43:25
 

Ken

2022 Aug 12 03:28:39
 

Skhilled

2022 Jul 24 09:26:29
Ah! I had forgotten about that.
 

Ken

2022 Jul 23 15:25:52
My sleep disorder was back, I have drugs that help me stay asleep but they make me stay out 'till 9-10AM so sometimes I skip a dose... and pay the price.  :-\
 

Skhilled

2022 Jul 23 14:14:49
You couldn't sleep or were just watching movies?
 

Ken

2022 Jul 23 06:00:18
All-nighters are just so lovely and this is the first one that I've to endure lately, so I guess there's no call for complaining overly much.  laughing7
 

Ken

2022 Jun 03 10:09:10
 

Ken

2022 Mar 11 07:08:08
 

Skhilled

2022 Feb 05 07:23:12
It was a bit rough for me as well. LOL

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Author Topic: Interesting Facts  (Read 592 times)

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Online Ken

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Re: Interesting Facts
« Reply #15 on: September 15, 2022, 02:33:26 PM »
Some of those school supply details I knew already, but not so much on thee bridges. Hearing about the rainy and dry seasons it makes sense that bridges would not work on the Amazon.
"Not all who wander are lost."-Tolkien
Yesterday When I was Young.

Offline Skhilled (OP)

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Re: Interesting Facts
« Reply #16 on: September 16, 2022, 10:20:02 AM »
The original patent for the fire hydrant was destroyed in a fire.

For early Americans, fire was a feared necessity; it warmed homes, provided hot meals, and offered late-night reading light. But fire could also destroy entire communities, which was probably the inspiration behind the invention of the fire hydrant — though we may never really know the full story, thanks to a fire in 1836.

At the time, Americans had been eagerly filing patents for nearly five decades thanks to the Patent Act of 1790, recommended to Congress by President George Washington himself. By the 1830s, the Patent Office housed nearly 10,000 patents — an impressive but risky collection considering they were all original documents with no copies.

On December 15, 1836, a fire in the basement of Blodgett’s Hotel (which then housed the Patent Office, U.S. Post Office, and a branch of the local fire department) smoldered from the embers of ashes that had been stored alongside firewood in a wooden box. Firefighters stationed in the building responded to the growing blaze, but couldn’t do much with the department’s dilapidated hoses. The former hotel — and every document inside — was gone in under 20 minutes. Assigned the impossible task of reconstructing its records, the Patent Office put out a call to inventors to mail in any documentation they had of their awarded patents, but only around 2,800 patents were restored. Those that couldn’t be reproduced were voided. In the years since, some scholars have pointed to Frederick Graff Sr., an early 19th-century Philadelphia engineer, as the possible inventor of the fire hydrant. However, another innovator by the name of Birdsill Holly Jr. was awarded a patent in 1869 for his “modern” fire hydrant, which was soon adopted in cities around the U.S. and Europe. Today, the United States Patent and Trademark Office takes up five buildings in Alexandria, Virginia, and many patents are applied for and stored digitally — making them much less likely, thankfully, to be destroyed by fire.

Offline Skhilled (OP)

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Re: Interesting Facts
« Reply #17 on: September 17, 2022, 08:54:42 AM »

Online Ken

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Re: Interesting Facts
« Reply #18 on: September 17, 2022, 08:55:21 AM »
Fire has always played an important role in human history, with evidence of fires use and misuse going back to the stone age.

A brief history of fire
Quote

    Fire: A Brief History (2nd edition)
    By Stephen J Pyne,
    Sydney, New South, 2019. 201 pp.

“All humans manipulate fire, and only humans do, we are truly a species touched by fire,” writes Stephen J Pyne, environmental historian and author, in Fire: A Brief History.

See also
Ecosocialism 2020: From rebellion to revolution
United States: In California, we need to fight fire with fire
Support urgently needed for rebuilding after Black Summer fires

First written in 2001 and republished in 2019, Fire examines the history of fire and the way it has affected the environment and the way this has been affected by humanity’s attempts to shape and use fire.

Pyne argues that fire’s history occurred in three stages. The first was Natural fire, which didn’t need the intervention of any species. These fires occurred regularly and nature adapted to this cycle.

The second was Anthropogenic fire. Anthropogenic fire begins with the earliest human societies, when humans first discovered fire and learnt to use its power for agricultural development. From this point, Humans would use fire to shape the environment around them with varying degrees of success.

Indigenous peoples around the world used various methods of fire control as a means of land management. For example, Indigenous Australians used firestick farming as well as creating lines of fire, as well as fire and fuel breaks, where they could maintain rather than create fire-driven landscapes.

For most of history, European societies tried to use fire for agricultural purposes, but tried to control fire rather accept its use in creating a fire-driven landscape. However, until the rise of Industrial capitalism, their success in controlling fire was limited, especially in urban areas where fires were common because of the abundance of flammable materials.

This brings us to the third period known as Industrial fire which relies on the burning of fossil fuels, releasing biomass and carbon dioxide. During this period, effective fireproof materials were developed, so that fire could be more effectively contained and therefore removed fire from human view.

This coincided with both the rise of industrial capitalism and the height of European colonialism. This means that humans were alienated from the effects of fire and the dispossession of Indigenous peoples, leading to the disappearance of Indigenous fire regimes that had previously dominated their landscapes.

The effect of this was noted in Sydney in 1848 by the NSW Surveyor-General Thomas Mitchell who wrote: “Kangaroos are no longer to be seen there, the grass is choked by underwood; neither are there natives to burn the grass”.

Without the fires, the fuels contained within them were eliminated and woody species overran the landscape.
"Not all who wander are lost."-Tolkien
Yesterday When I was Young.

Online Ken

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Re: Interesting Facts
« Reply #19 on: September 17, 2022, 08:57:08 AM »
"Not all who wander are lost."-Tolkien
Yesterday When I was Young.

Offline Skhilled (OP)

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Re: Interesting Facts
« Reply #20 on: September 17, 2022, 08:58:47 AM »
I remember reading some of this years ago...about the fires. :)

Offline Skhilled (OP)

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Re: Interesting Facts
« Reply #21 on: September 22, 2022, 10:17:23 AM »
Google Maps once listed a town that never existed.

I actually remember this. LMAO

There’s off the map, and then there’s Argleton. The English town was visible on Google Maps until 2009, which is notable for one major reason: No such place exists. So how did it get listed? Though never confirmed by Google, it’s been speculated that Argleton may have been akin to a trap street — a fictitious road used by cartographers to catch anyone copying their work. The reasoning is as simple as it is clever: If a street (or, in this case, town) that you made up ends up on another map, you’ll have caught its creator red-handed in copyright infringement.

Though little more than an empty field in West Lancashire, Argleton once had its own (presumably auto-generated) job listings and weather forecasts. Once its (non-)existence became known on the internet, humorous T-shirts with slogans such as “New York, London, Paris, Argleton” and “I visited Argleton and all I got was this T-shirt” appeared online, too. Google itself was tight-lipped on the subject, releasing a brief statement noting that “Google Maps data comes from a variety of data sources. While the vast majority of this information is correct there are occasional errors.” The good people of Argleton likely would have been highly offended by that characterization — if they actually existed.

Online Ken

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Re: Interesting Facts
« Reply #22 on: Today at 12:20:25 PM »
 laughing7
"Not all who wander are lost."-Tolkien
Yesterday When I was Young.